The Traffic Stop II

On September 7, 2019 Jeremy Dewitte was arrested by Windermere Police Department for resisting arrest, unlawful use of a two-way communication device and falsely impersonating a police officer.

Sergeant Mark DeStefano claimed he observed Jeremy Dewitte stopping traffic while flashing lights on his motorcycle at a roundabout on Maguire Road and Park Avenue.

As Jeremy Dewitte and employees of Metro-State Special Services left the area around a tree-lined bend, Sergeant DeStefano stated he never lost sight of Dewitte while he was on his motorcycle and allegedly crossing a double yellow line.

While conducting the traffic stop Jeremy Dewitte’s Florida tag came back as a HIT for a stolen vehicle. Dewitte was placed in handcuffs and detained during the investigation.

In the end Jeremy Dewitte was arrested and charged for resisting arrest without violence, unlawful use of a two-way communication device and falsely impersonating a police officer. The charge for an unlawful use of a two-way communication device was dropped and replaced with a reckless driving charge by the State of Florida.

In September 2020, Jeremy Dewitte was in Windermere, Florida for a business meeting. According to Dewitte, while he was driving he noticed a Windermere police officer following his Metro-State Special Services vehicle in a squad car.

On September 13, 2020 Metro-State Special Services employees Alec Ringdahl, Andrew Ross, Dean Perry and an employee who goes by the callsign of “Oaks” conducted a funeral escort with Apopka Police Department.

During the funeral procession Alec Ringdahl noticed Sergeant Keith Vidler from Orange County Sheriff’s Office parked under a bridge observing Metro-State employees and Apopka police officers.

Sergeant Keith Vidler was in his unmarked patrol car fully dressed in his uniform.

Dean Perry and Oaks were stopped by Sergeant Vidler and received multiple tickets. One of the tickets they received stated both of the men displayed flashing purple lights outside of the funeral procession. According to Metro-State Special Services employees, Sergeant Keith Vidler stopped them during the funeral procession.

Sergeant Vidler’s complaint claimed Perry and Oaks violated Florida Statute 316.2397(7) which states flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles unless with certain exceptions such as a motorist who flashes his lights to change lanes or uses his lights to indicate his vehicle is lawfully stopped. Alec Ringdahl uploaded a video of the encounter.

Florida Statute 316.1974(2)(a) states non-law enforcement funeral escort vehicles shall be equipped with at least one lighted circulation lamp exhibiting an amber or purple light or lens. Flashing amber or purple lights may be used only when such vehicles are used in a funeral procession.

Over the last few months we have received several items from Metro-State Special Services including video footage, screenshots, and text messages. A series of text messages from Steven “Recycle” Negron and photographs of Steven Negron and Victor “Photo” Lopez were forwarded to us this week.

Jeremy Dewitte’s next court date is September 23, 2020 for a trial management conference with Judge Renee Roche.