Tag: Windermere Police Department

The Emails Part 2

January 25, 2021 7:07 AM EST

In Part 1 of The Emails we discussed several emails exchanged between deputy sheriffs from Orange County and the surrounding counties. The emails were shared with this site via a third party. Any notes or highlights were not made by this site.

Although Sergeant Keith Vidler was a motor officer for Orange County Sheriff’s Office, he was at one time given permission to lead the investigation over the Jeremy Dewitte case. He and his motor partner Corporal John Ramsey were ordered to stop their investigation in December 2019.

Before his orders to stand down, Sergeant Vidler exchanged hundreds of emails with other members of law enforcement, including Detective John Allen from Windermere Police Department. Windermere Police Department was the first agency to arrest Jeremy Dewitte for allegedly impersonating a police officer in September 2019.

On September 11, 2019 Detective John Allen shared a link to a Chicago, Illinois news article featuring Jeremy Dewitte. During the infamous Chicago incident Jeremy Dewitte was accused of throwing chairs at a tow truck driver. Dewitte was arrested but later released and all charges against him were dismissed in 2020.

Detective John Allen sent the Chicago emails approximately six months before video footage was released online.

Detective Allen also tried to help Sergeant Keith Vidler find probable cause for a search warrant. Sergeant Vidler was unable to articulate why he needed certain video files from Jeremy Dewitte’s cameras.

Sergeant Keith Vidler also contacted Orange County Sheriff’s Office employees James Montgomery and Junella Uadan for assistance with his search warrants.

The following day the search warrant was rejected by Judge Michael Murphy.

An employee history for Sergeant Keith Vidler was located in one portion of the documents we received. Sergeant Vidler received multiple complaints during his career as a law enforcement officer with Orange County Sheriff’s Office. Complainants claimed Vidler was rude, abrasive and vulgar and he lacked the courtesy that was required from a public servant.

On more than one occasion the deputy sheriff was accused of mishandling investigations as well as falsifying documents.

In 2009 a citizen claimed Sergeant Keith Vidler harassed him about a personal business arrangement between the two.

In 2005 a complaint was sustained after Sergeant Vidler wrecked a vehicle on-duty.

One of the first complainants stated Sergeant Keith Vidler used racial slurs towards him and allowed his canine to bite the individual. The law enforcement officer was also accused of using excessive force nearly 30 times.

In Part 3 of the emails we will discuss the agencies Orange County Sheriff’s Office and Sergeant Keith Vidler contacted as well as the interesting response from one federal agency.

The Emails Part I

January 15, 2021 8:38 AM EST

Hundreds of emails to and from Sergeant Keith Vidler of Orange County Sheriff’s Office were shared with this site recently. The emails specifically mentioned Jeremy Dewitte and anyone affiliated with him or Metro-State Special Services.

One of the first emails we shared was a letter from Sergeant Keith Vidler to his supervisor Captain Sandy Carpenter in December 2019. According to a source Sergeant Vidler and several employees from the Motors division of Orange County Sheriff’s Office were given orders to stand down and end their investigation into Jeremy Dewitte and Metro-State Special Services.

Before the order was given Sergeant Keith Vidler and numerous members of law enforcement in Florida and around the country appeared to be fixated with Metro-State Special Services and Jeremy Dewitte in particular. The emails were shared with us and we are releasing them in their rawest form. Any highlighting and notes were not made from this site.

On May 20, 2019 Sergeant Keith Vidler sent an email to one of the attorneys for Orange County Sheriff’s Office, Austin Moore. Sergeant Vidler believed the use of pepper ball guns was illegal. Moore contacted the supervisor of misdemeanors who corrected him and said the use of pepper ball guns was never illegal.

Sergeant Keith Vidler sent an email to Assistant State Attorney Steven Casey Miller on October 21, 2019. In the email Sergeant Vidler stated the use of badges was also unlawful.

Steven Casey Miller clearly stated the use of badges wasn’t illegal but in his opinion the combination of the uniforms and the vehicles gave the appearance of an impersonation of a police officer.

Sergeant Vidler reached out to Austin Moore again on October 28, 2019. Vidler questioned why he couldn’t press charges against Jeremy Dewitte who he believed forced his employees to impersonate, specifically security officers, not police officers. Austin Moore stated Jeremy Dewitte couldn’t force his employees, who were adults, to impersonate security guards and the employees could have quit or said no and didn’t at any time.

This contradicted the statements made by Sergeant Keith Vidler and former Metro-State employees.

Austin Moore also rejected a warrant written by Sergeant Keith Vidler on October 30, 2019. Moore didn’t believe Sergeant Keith Vidler and John Ramsey needed any of the files located on Jeremy Dewitte’s office computer. Sergeant Vidler claimed Jeremy Dewitte made a confession about the evidence in his office. The confession has yet to surface but if it does we will update this post.

Sergeant Vidler sent an email to Detective John Allen from Windermere Police Department. Windermere Police Department was the first agency to arrest Jeremy Dewitte in 2019 for allegedly impersonating a police officer.

In the email Sergeant Keith Vidler asked Detective John Allen for advice on how to properly word a subpoena request. Detective Allen attached samples of subpoena requests he’d used in the past. Detective Allen wasn’t the last person Sergeant Vidler asked for assistance for rejected requests. We will discuss those emails at a later date.

During this time Corporal John Ramsey and in particular Sergeant Keith Vidler corresponded with other police officers and agencies about Jeremy Dewitte and Metro-State Special Services. In one email Corporal John Tart from Orange County Sheriff’s Office contacted law enforcement in Lake County, Volusia County, Brevard County, Polk County and Osceola County.

On October 8, 2019 Corporal Tart spoke on behalf of Sergeant Keith Vidler and asked the other agencies if they were aware of Metro-State Special Services and if they too were interested in “getting on the same sheet of music and equally hammering these guys.”

Detective Jorge Covas appeared to enjoy the same sheet music because he emailed Corporal John Ramsey on November 5, 2019 to inquire about upcoming funeral processions for Metro-State Special Services. Detective Covas stated his admin wanted warrants “pretty bad” for Metro-State Special Services in Osceola County.

Prior to the email exchange between Orange and Osceola Counties, Sergeant Jeff Wingard from Volusia County Sheriff’s Office asked Sergeant Keith Vidler to make a PowerPoint presentation about Jeremy Dewitte and Metro-State Special Services on October 30, 2019 in Deland, Florida.

In a redacted email from September 2019 there were claims that Sergeant Keith Vidler was contacting multiple federal agencies about Jeremy Dewitte and Metro-State Special Services.

One of the agencies Sergeant Vidler emailed was the Division of Worker’s Compensation. In a series of emails which will be uploaded in the next few posts, Sergeant Keith Vidler and compliance investigator Linda Offutt discussed Jeremy Dewitte’s finances as well as what they believed to be the inner workings of Metro-State Special Services.

Soon we will discuss the other agencies Sergeant Keith Vidler contacted repeatedly to report Jeremy Dewitte which include the FBI, IRS and TSA.

The Dr. Phil Show

November 13, 2020 12:00 AM EST

On September 28, 2020 a producer from The Dr. Phil Show contacted Jeremy Dewitte and asked him if he would like the opportunity to tell his side of the story on national television regarding his police impersonation cases in Orlando, Florida.

JeremyDewitteCase.com was also contacted by The Dr. Phil Show. According to a producer, this website showed a different side of the story and was the reason they wanted to hear Jeremy Dewitte’s version of events.

YouTube’s Real World Police was contacted as well. A producer stated they made several attempts to have a phone conversation with Jay Horowitz who operates the channel but they were dodged and communication only occurred via Twitter and email. The producer claimed the channel owner was worried about lawsuits against him.

The producer stated there were other channels and blogs the show was considering to bring on to replace Real World Police in the event they refused to appear on the show.

Ultimately after multiple emails, extensive phone calls and video messages regarding COVID-19 testing, topics that would be discussed, fees and accommodations, Jeremy Dewitte and his defense attorney Amir Ladan signed the appropriate release forms to appear on Dr. Phil’s show in Los Angeles, California.

Days before his flight to California, Jeremy Dewitte’s “Motor One” motorcycle was picked up by an auto transport company in Orlando and delivered to Los Angeles by the show. Dewitte and Amir Ladan were also required to produce negative COVID-19 results prior to boarding their flights.

On October 29, 2020 Dr. Phil’s show sent a videographer to Orlando, Florida to take B-roll footage of Jeremy Dewitte while he discussed Metro-State Special Services, showcased his fleet of vehicles and rode his motorcycle in the city. The motorcycle ride was cut short because unmarked Orange County Sheriff’s Office vehicles were directly behind Dewitte during the shoot.

On November 1, 2020 Jeremy Dewitte flew to Los Angeles, California to begin the four-day filming process.

Jeremy Dewitte was tested two more times for COVID-19 in California at Hollywood Urgent Care. During his first day of filming he was interviewed at The Loft by a segment producer for the show while Amir Ladan joined in virtually from his Los Angeles hotel room due to COVID-19 restrictions at the location.

On his second day of filming Jeremy Dewitte was given a polygraph examination using the Empirical Scoring System, Multinomial (ESS-M). Jeremy Dewitte volunteered for the test and was never asked to take the exam by the show.

Prior to his examination the producers for The Dr. Phil Show stated the questions would cover the time period of 2011 to 2020.

In Part Two of this post we will discuss the types of questions but not the specific questions that were asked, the polygraph examiner’s background and why Jeremy Dewitte volunteered for the exam, while being mindful that the episode has yet to air and certain topics will not be discussed until this occurs.

Producers for the show agreed to bring security expert John Stirn on the stage. Stirn is the owner of the lucrative company Southwest Patrol in Los Angeles, California. John Stirn started Southwest Patrol in 1994. He has contracts with several businesses in the area and provides security detail for the Los Angeles Lakers.

After he met Jeremy Dewitte in person John Stirn stated his opinions about Dewitte changed and he could see the harassment and corruption from the police departments.

The show reached out to Windermere Police Department, Orlando Police Department and Orange County Sheriff’s Office several times and according to the producers they received generic responses from the agencies.

The producers claimed Real World Police refused to make an appearance and in lieu of Jay Horowitz they chose a YouTuber with the channel name of Blue Bacon to join the stage.

During his pre-interview the YouTuber Blue Bacon claimed he knew Jeremy Dewitte was impersonating police despite giving Dewitte a neutral interview several months before and stating he wanted to help Metro-State Special Services at the time.

Dr. Phil and Jeremy Dewitte confronted the YouTuber about his new attitude towards Metro-State and Jeremy Dewitte. When confronted Blue Bacon allegedly backed down and recanted his accusatory statements. During a commercial break Dr. Phil asked the producers to politely remove Blue Bacon from the stage.

Dr. Phil, Jeremy Dewitte and Amir Ladan continued to discuss Jeremy Dewitte’s and Dr. Phil’s love for motorcycles, Dewitte’s pending felony cases and Orange County Sheriff’s Office. Dr. Phil expressed he didn’t believe Dewitte belonged in prison and he didn’t believe any prison time was necessary or helpful.

Because the show has yet to air we cannot go into deeper detail about what occurred onstage or behind the scenes at this time. In Part Two of this post we will discuss the polygraph examination. Once the show airs we will be able to release more information about the filming process.

The Traffic Stop II

On September 7, 2019 Jeremy Dewitte was arrested by Windermere Police Department for resisting arrest, unlawful use of a two-way communication device and falsely impersonating a police officer.

Sergeant Mark DeStefano claimed he observed Jeremy Dewitte stopping traffic while flashing lights on his motorcycle at a roundabout on Maguire Road and Park Avenue.

As Jeremy Dewitte and employees of Metro-State Special Services left the area around a tree-lined bend, Sergeant DeStefano stated he never lost sight of Dewitte while he was on his motorcycle and allegedly crossing a double yellow line.

While conducting the traffic stop Jeremy Dewitte’s Florida tag came back as a HIT for a stolen vehicle. Dewitte was placed in handcuffs and detained during the investigation.

In the end Jeremy Dewitte was arrested and charged for resisting arrest without violence, unlawful use of a two-way communication device and falsely impersonating a police officer. The charge for an unlawful use of a two-way communication device was dropped and replaced with a reckless driving charge by the State of Florida.

In September 2020, Jeremy Dewitte was in Windermere, Florida for a business meeting. According to Dewitte, while he was driving he noticed a Windermere police officer following his Metro-State Special Services vehicle in a squad car.

On September 13, 2020 Metro-State Special Services employees Alec Ringdahl, Andrew Ross, Dean Perry and an employee who goes by the callsign of “Oaks” conducted a funeral escort with Apopka Police Department.

During the funeral procession Alec Ringdahl noticed Sergeant Keith Vidler from Orange County Sheriff’s Office parked under a bridge observing Metro-State employees and Apopka police officers.

Sergeant Keith Vidler was in his unmarked patrol car fully dressed in his uniform.

Dean Perry and Oaks were stopped by Sergeant Vidler and received multiple tickets. One of the tickets they received stated both of the men displayed flashing purple lights outside of the funeral procession. According to Metro-State Special Services employees, Sergeant Keith Vidler stopped them during the funeral procession.

Sergeant Vidler’s complaint claimed Perry and Oaks violated Florida Statute 316.2397(7) which states flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles unless with certain exceptions such as a motorist who flashes his lights to change lanes or uses his lights to indicate his vehicle is lawfully stopped. Alec Ringdahl uploaded a video of the encounter.

Florida Statute 316.1974(2)(a) states non-law enforcement funeral escort vehicles shall be equipped with at least one lighted circulation lamp exhibiting an amber or purple light or lens. Flashing amber or purple lights may be used only when such vehicles are used in a funeral procession.

Over the last few months we have received several items from Metro-State Special Services including video footage, screenshots, and text messages. A series of text messages from Steven “Recycle” Negron and photographs of Steven Negron and Victor “Photo” Lopez were forwarded to us this week.

Jeremy Dewitte’s next court date is September 23, 2020 for a trial management conference with Judge Renee Roche.

The Missing Files Part I

On September 16, 2019 Jeremy Dewitte and Deputy Sheriff Todd Mohney contacted 911 in reference to an incident which occurred between the two.

Mohney claimed Jeremy Dewitte attempted to pull him over and impersonate a police officer while driving erratically during a funeral procession. Dewitte claimed Todd Mohney hit him with his vehicle and refused to leave the funeral procession.

Orlando Police Department arrived at Blue Jacket Park and defused the situation. Sergeant Keith Vidler from Orange County Sheriff’s Office also arrived on the scene and detained Metro-State Special Services employees Victor Lopez, Steven Negron and Randall Brocius.

Lopez and Negron were released but Brocius was arrested for openly carrying a weapon.

On the scene Sergeant Vidler spoke to Jeremy Dewitte about a run-in he had with another Metro-State Special Services employee with the callsign of “Repo.” Vidler stated Repo almost ran him off of the road in Lake County, Florida.

We had the opportunity to speak to Repo as he explained his side of the story in an interview we conducted this week.

After the arrest of Randall Brocius, Jeremy Dewitte hired an attorney and filed a complaint with Orange County Sheriff’s Office against Todd Mohney.

A USB flash drive contained hours of video, including the Lake County incident, a separate encounter with Sergeant Keith Vidler during a funeral procession, video surveillance of Sergeant Keith Vidler allegedly attempting to open a locked window at Metro-State’s former headquarters and the extended version of the exchange between Mohney and Dewitte.

According to a source from Metro-State Special Services, the flash drive was given to someone the company believed to be from Professional Standards. Instead the flash drive was allegedly given to Sergeant Keith Vidler, Corporal John Ramsey and Deputy Waesco during an interview. The complaint was not investigated by Professional Standards.

The flash drive is no longer available.

Windermere Police Department claimed they also lost helmet camera video files from the day of Jeremy Dewitte’s September arrest.

After Corporal John Ramsey and Sergeant Keith Vidler conducted a search of a previous Metro-State office location in October 2019, there have been claims of missing surveillance footage taken during the search.

The source also provided text messages between Sergeant Keith Vidler and Jeremy Dewitte who texted one another from September 2019 until March 2020.

In October 2019 Sergeant Vidler set up a surveillance operation of Metro-State Special Services and Jeremy Dewitte. During the surveillance Sergeant Vidler spoke to himself and possibly one other person as he watched a funeral procession pass by.

On August 31, 2020, Rachel Mattie, defense attorney for Randall Brocius, filed a motion in limine. She claimed Sergeant Keith Vidler’s narrative was prejudicial.

A hearing has been set and it is up to Judge Renee Roche to make the final decision.

On September 9, 2020, Dylan Vogt’s defense attorney, Michael Barber, withdrew as counsel stating there was a conflict of interest.

Jeremy Dewitte’s next court date is November 10, 2020 for a pre-trial conference.

And in July 2020, 10 months after the case began, Jeremy Dewitte’s daughter was born.